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Home Gaming Review: Sea Of Solitude: The Director's Cut - Fun While It Lasts,...

Review: Sea Of Solitude: The Director’s Cut – Fun While It Lasts, Which Isn’t Long

Sea by name, C by nature.

There are simply not enough games where you get to ride around in a boat. It was the best part of Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag, formed the pulse-pounding backbone of Hydro Thunder, and it’s everyone’s favourite bit in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. Cars, planes and humans are cool and all, but boats? They really float our… what was it again?

Great news for us enthusiasts – Sea of Solitude has a pretty significant amount of boating action. Just like in real life, the ocean here contains a gigantic supernatural monster that wants nothing more than to scoop you up into its enormous mouth and consume you, crunching your bones between its teeth. It’s concerning, then, that also just like real life (in a few years’ time), the ocean seems to cover 90% of Sea of Solitude’s beautifully-realised world. And it really is stunningly attractive, even in handheld mode – the gorgeous architecture married with the constantly rising and falling ebb and flow of the water lends it an aesthetic quite unlike anything else, raising the proceedings above the level of its unfortunately rather generic and meandering story.

Read the full article on nintendolife.com

Sea by name, C by nature.

There are simply not enough games where you get to ride around in a boat. It was the best part of Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag, formed the pulse-pounding backbone of Hydro Thunder, and it’s everyone’s favourite bit in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. Cars, planes and humans are cool and all, but boats? They really float our… what was it again?

Great news for us enthusiasts – Sea of Solitude has a pretty significant amount of boating action. Just like in real life, the ocean here contains a gigantic supernatural monster that wants nothing more than to scoop you up into its enormous mouth and consume you, crunching your bones between its teeth. It’s concerning, then, that also just like real life (in a few years’ time), the ocean seems to cover 90% of Sea of Solitude’s beautifully-realised world. And it really is stunningly attractive, even in handheld mode – the gorgeous architecture married with the constantly rising and falling ebb and flow of the water lends it an aesthetic quite unlike anything else, raising the proceedings above the level of its unfortunately rather generic and meandering story.

Read the full article on nintendolife.com

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