Thursday, February 25, 2021
Home Gaming God of War's 60fps upgrade for PS5: the final flourish for an...

God of War’s 60fps upgrade for PS5: the final flourish for an incredible game

God of War – the 2018 sequel for PlayStation 4 – has finally received a patch for PlayStation 5, and in common with similar updates for Days Gone and Ghost of Tsushima, it opens the door to a classic game running flat out at 60 frames per second – and in common with those other Sony first party juggernauts, the impact is indeed transformative. It’s almost like the final piece of the puzzle: the original release was hugely impressive with its 4K graphics, extreme detail, phenomenal lighting and excellent performances. A nigh-on flawless 60 frames per second is the final flourish for a game that pushed PS4 and PS4 Pro to its limits.

In fact, before we talk about the raw performance numbers, we should probably address what you might call the quality of life improvement. In extracting so much from the last-gen silicon, Santa Monica Studio inadvertently ran head-first into another issue – the cooling design of PS4 and PS4 Pro. God of War actually became our title of choice for testing power draw, acoustics and thermal performance of PlayStation hardware. On the noise front especially, this game caused the fans to spin up to an obtrusive degree, depending on which iteration of the hardware you have. Beyond what’s happening with the software, God of War on PS5 is a much more pleasant experience simply because a nuanced story of profound loss and parenthood plays out without high-pitched fans running at max speed in the background.

And in returning to God of War, what struck me was just how risky this title would have been for SIE and Santa Monica Studio. A number of gambles here pay off spectacularly. A series that began life as a technologically state of the art arcade brawler with set-piece bosses has slowed down, there’s a genuine story here and fully fleshed out characters. By comparison, the older God of War titles almost feel like exaggerated word-of-mouth legends. Regardless, Santa Monica Studio has moved on, the story has moved on and maybe the audience has moved on too.

Read more

God of War – the 2018 sequel for PlayStation 4 – has finally received a patch for PlayStation 5, and in common with similar updates for Days Gone and Ghost of Tsushima, it opens the door to a classic game running flat out at 60 frames per second – and in common with those other Sony first party juggernauts, the impact is indeed transformative. It’s almost like the final piece of the puzzle: the original release was hugely impressive with its 4K graphics, extreme detail, phenomenal lighting and excellent performances. A nigh-on flawless 60 frames per second is the final flourish for a game that pushed PS4 and PS4 Pro to its limits.

In fact, before we talk about the raw performance numbers, we should probably address what you might call the quality of life improvement. In extracting so much from the last-gen silicon, Santa Monica Studio inadvertently ran head-first into another issue – the cooling design of PS4 and PS4 Pro. God of War actually became our title of choice for testing power draw, acoustics and thermal performance of PlayStation hardware. On the noise front especially, this game caused the fans to spin up to an obtrusive degree, depending on which iteration of the hardware you have. Beyond what’s happening with the software, God of War on PS5 is a much more pleasant experience simply because a nuanced story of profound loss and parenthood plays out without high-pitched fans running at max speed in the background.

And in returning to God of War, what struck me was just how risky this title would have been for SIE and Santa Monica Studio. A number of gambles here pay off spectacularly. A series that began life as a technologically state of the art arcade brawler with set-piece bosses has slowed down, there’s a genuine story here and fully fleshed out characters. By comparison, the older God of War titles almost feel like exaggerated word-of-mouth legends. Regardless, Santa Monica Studio has moved on, the story has moved on and maybe the audience has moved on too.

Read more

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Recent Comments